Animal Watch

Animal News in Arlington, Virginia

June 11, 2016 – 2650 S. Arlington Mill Dr.

A woman brought a bird to the shelter because she thought it was injured. Upon arrival, the bird was examined and determined to be a healthy fledgling Finch, who was a bit overheated from sitting on some hot pavement. The bird was placed in a box so the finder could drive it back to the location where it was found and  replace it in the cover of some shade for its parents to continue caring for it. If you notice a fledgling bird in an inhospitable position, the best action is to gently place the bird either back in its nest or to the cover of a nearby bush so the parent birds can find and care for the baby.

 

June 13 & 14, 2016 – 2300 block S. Shirlington Rd.

Animal Control received calls regarding a young deer frequenting a high-traffic area.  Animal Control Officers are not allowed to disturb or relocate deer, and efforts to move deer along to safer locations are likely to be futile. If a deer is creating a road hazard, call Arlington County Police so they can redirect traffic.

June 3, 2016 – 1100 block S. Joyce Street

Animal Control received a call from someone who was alarmed to see a large black snake lying in the middle of the sidewalk. An Animal Control Officer responded to find a healthy Eastern Blacksnake lounging on the warm pavement. It’s an active time for local native snakes, which have emerged from a long hibernation seeking warmth. Vital to the control of pests like rats, the snake was redirected to a more appropriate sunning spot, nearby.

June 4, 2016 – 3800 block North Stafford Street

Animal Control received a call from someone who had managed to confine a stray dog they found to the Madison Off-leash Dog Park. An Animal Control Officer responded to pick up the dog, who was noted to have a collar with a tag from a foreign country. The dog was impounded at the shelter and scanned for a microchip, which was found. At the same time the officer was gathering owner information from the microchip company, the dog’s owner called. He promptly came to the shelter to reclaim the dog.

June 6, 2016 – 4100 block N. Peary Street

Animal Control received a flurry of calls about a raccoon in the area that was walking very slowly with labored breathing sounds. An Animal Control Officer captured the sick raccoon and transported to the shelter for humane euthanasia.

May 17, 2016 – 2000 block North Oakland Street

Animal Control received a call regarding two baby birds that had fallen from their nest. An Animal Control Officer found that one of the birds had passed away, but the other appeared healthy. The Officer placed the partially feathered baby bird in a wicker basket to replace the nest, which was destroyed, to provide the parent birds an opportunity to keep raising their young.

May 5, 2016 – 2800 block. S.  Buchanan Street

Animal Control received a call that there was a raccoon who appeared to have his head stuck behind an iron fence and a brick wall. An Animal Control Officer was able to remove the juvenile raccoon from his predicament without incident. The Officer placed the raccoon in a crate that was fashioned so that the mother raccoon could come and easily reclaim her baby. An Animal Control Officer checked the crate later on the same evening to ensure that the baby had been reclaimed.

May 7, 2016 – 900 block N. Danville Street

Animal Control received a call from a couple who saw a kitten jump into the undercarriage of their car as they slowed down. An Animal Control Officer  used food to lure the kitten into an area where she could reach in and grab the little guy, who was quite hungry. The kitten was impounded for a stray hold and medical care. The car owners have expressed an interest in adopting him.

May 8, 2016 – 5500 blk 18th Street N.

Animal Control received a call from a woman who noted an injured bird lying in her driveway. An Animal Control Officer examined the bird, a Goldfinch, who appeared stunned – she likely struck a window. Often, these birds just need a little time to recover before taking off again. The Officer took the bird out to an open area of the front yard to see if it could fly away, which it did.

April 27, 2016 – 2500 block S. Arlington Mill Drive

Animal Control received a call from someone who noted a baby rabbit in the area with an obvious injury. An Animal Control Officer responded to impound the juvenile rabbit who had an injury consistent with a lawnmower blade slice. The rabbit was transferred to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator for care and eventual release. Rabbit nests are shallow and unassuming – please look before you mow!

April 27, 2016 – 1800 block Columbia Pike

Animal Control received a call to pick up a snake in an apartment building hallway. An Animal Control Officer responded to impound a juvenile domestic Ball Python. The Officer received a message later the same night about someone in the apartment who was missing their pet snake. The owner came down to the shelter to reclaim the snake.

May 1, 2016 – 2500 block North Utah Street

Animal Control received a call that there was an injured fox trapped under a vehicle. An Animal Control Officer responded to find that the red fox was already deceased. The fox was impounded for disposal.

April 19, 2016 – 3800 blk. Washington Blvd.

Animal Control received a call from a woman who found a single baby rabbit, eyes still closed, completely exposed in a playground area. The caller searched the area for the rabbit’s original nest, but could not locate one. It’s possible that this baby rabbit was dropped by a predator! The caller was willing to bring the baby down to the shelter, where she was impounded and transferred to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator for care and eventual release.

April 19, 2016 – 1300 blk. S. Glebe Road

Animal Control received a call from a gentleman who found a nestling (without feathers) baby bird on his porch. The caller was asked to look around for the original nest in the hopes of replacing the baby, but while doing so, the caller found another nestling bird on the ground. An Animal Control Officer responded with reuniting supplies in hand, including a wicker basket and some zip ties. The baby birds were placed in the basket together and secured to the tree, as close as possible to the original nest-site for the parent birds to continue to care for.

April 17, 2016 – 1500 blk. S. George Mason Drive

Animal Control received a call about a baby bird found on the sidewalk. An Animal Control Officer responded to find a nestling (no feathers) sparrow. Ideally, the bird should be placed back in its original nest; however, the nest was beyond reach. Since the baby bird was featherless and unable to regulate its body temperature without the company of its siblings, it was impounded for transfer to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.

 

April 1, 2016 – Fort Meyer Base

Animal Control received a call for assistance from the Arlington County Police Department to pick up a cat from a vehicle, whose owner was being arrested. An Animal Control Officer arrived to impound the cat for Protective Custody until a family member could reclaim her.

 

March 23, 2016 – 2650 S. Arlington Mill Drive

A man emailed the League a photo of a nest he found in a planter, inquiring about what the baby animals inside might be, and how to help them. A staff member reviewed the photo and determined that the nest is that of a cottontail rabbit, native to the area. Mother rabbits will place their babies in a shallow nest and cover them with her own fur, then leave the area for most of the day, only returning at dawn and dusk to nurse, so as not to attract the attention of predators to the nest location. Baby rabbits are quick to develop; fully weaned, they’re about the size of a tennis ball, with open eyes and erect ears – about 21 days from birth to independence!

March 24, 2016 – 500 blk. S. Carlin Springs Road

Animal Control received a call to pick up a dead Canadian Goose on the side of the road. An Animal Control Officer responded to find not only the deceased Goose, but also her partner, nearby. Canadian Geese are known to be “monogamous,” but that doesn’t necessarily mean they mate for life; they may remain together until one partner dies, after which the surviving bird will seek another mate.

 

March 25, 2016 – 4516 N. Carlin Springs Road

Animal Control received a call to remove a snake, confined in the callers’ home. An Animal Control Officer responded but could not locate a snake; however, she did note a long, cylindrical piece of metal, which was mistaken for a snake.

March 25, 2016 – 2650 S. Arlington Mill Drive

A woman who had just hit a mother squirrel with her vehicle stopped and brought a baby squirrel to the League. The baby squirrel was likely being moved to an alternate nest-site: mother squirrels will move their young if the original nest is somehow compromised. The baby had a laceration to his leg, which was cleaned by animal care staff before the little squirrel was transferred to a local wildlife rehabilitator for care and eventual release.